Woman Commits Suicide Over Diverted Mothers' Medical Fees

1456 Views Moroto, Uganda

In short
Regina Nawal alias Komuwa reportedly used a shredded mosquito net to hang herself in her family hut. This, after her sister allegedly diverted the money meant for medical bills of their mother.

A woman in Moroto has committed suicide after her elder sister diverted money meant to cater for their mothers' medical dues into personal use. Regina Nawal, alias "Komuwa" reportedly used a shredded mosquito net to hang herself in her family hut. 
Relatives found her laying dead on the floor, with her four year-old baby crying at the door. This happened at Lomario village, Rupa Parish, Rupa sub-county in Moroto district.

The Karamoja police spokesperson, Irene Aceng told URN that Nawal's mother was admitted last month at Kidepo Health Center III, with Nawal taking care of her. She however left an elder sister to take care of the mother, to allow her work to get money for medical bills.
Police says Nawala continued to send money in installments to her sister, but when the time came for their mother to be discharged, she was held at the facility for lack of payment. Nawal's sister had reported diverted the money, which angered Nawal and she decided to commit suicide.
The deceased's mother was admitted and bedridden for four months, but by press time, we could not confirm the amount owed the facility. A postmortem was conducted at the scene by a Moroto Referral Hospital doctor, and indicated death by asphyxia. Police ordered for the burial at her marital home.

Reports indicate suicide cases are on the rise especially in the districts of Napak and Moroto. Aceng says they will engage the community to discourage the practice and encourage aggrieved people to seek support from local councils to resolve conflicts.

 

About the author

Olandason Wanyama
Olandason Wanyama is the Karamoja region bureau chief. Amudat, Nakapiripirit, Moroto, Abim, Kotido and Kaabong districts fall under his docket. Wanyama has been a URN staff member since 2012.

The former teacher boasts of 20 years journalism experience. Wanyama started out as a freelance writer for the Daily Monitor newspaper in 1991 in Entebbe. Wanyama also wrote for the army publication Tarehe Sita, the Uganda National Roads Authority (UNRA) magazine and The New Vision. While not on the beat, Wanyama taught child soldiers at Uganda Airforce School-Katabi.

Wanyama is very interested in conflict reporting, climate change, education, health and business reporting. He is also an avid photographic chronicler of vanishing tribal life in the East African region.