Uganda Joins 16 Days of Activism to Fight Gender Based Violence

1927 Views Kampala, Uganda

In short
This years Orange the World initiative will focus on raising money to end violence against women and girls. UN Women is taking the lead in galvanizing global attention and action to end violence, a pandemic that impacts one in three women worldwide, some of whom are tortured by relatives and friends.

From marches in Uganda and Timor-Leste, to a public rally on motorbikes in Pakistan, the world is taking to the streets today to say no to violence against women and girls.

The campaign under the 'Orange the World initiative' starts the 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence, which runs from 25 November, the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women, until Human Rights Day, December 10.

Global events marking the 16 Days of Activism this year will include lighting major landmarks in orange - the colour chosen to symbolize a bright and optimistic future free from violence.

The landmarks include among others, Uganda's Parliament building, the New York City Mayor's Gracie Mansion and City Hall, the European Commission Headquarters Building in Belgium, the Panama Canal Administration Building and the Presidential Palace in Ecuador.

This year's "Orange the World" initiative will focus on raising money to end violence against women and girls.  UN Women is taking the lead in galvanizing global attention and action to end violence, a pandemic that impacts one in three women worldwide, some of whom are tortured by relatives and friends.

Of all women who were victims of homicide globally in 2012, almost half were killed by intimate partners or family members. Not only does violence against women and girls have negative consequences for those who experience it, but also their families, the community and society at large, a recent research by the Centre for Domestic Violence Prevention indicates.

"Women and girls who experience violence have their rights trampled on, they live in fear and pain, and in the worst cases they pay with their lives. Yet, still in many countries, the criminal justice system is remote, expensive and biased in favour of the male perpetrators", UN Women Executive Director Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka has said in a statement.

Evidence also shows the immense cost of violence against women and girls on many levels, with significant threats to the household's economic welfare both in the short and longer term.

"Change to these elements has a cost, yet the price of no change is unacceptable. Even relatively small-scale investments that are timely and well-targeted can bring enormous benefits to women and girls and to their wider communities," she added.