Turkana Pastoralists Expelled from Kaabong

1934 Views Abim, Uganda

In short
The pastoralists who migrated from Turkana, Kenya in 2010 due to chronic drought have been camping in Kalapata and Loyoro Sub Counties. The areas lie along the Uganda-Kenya border.

At least 10,000 Turkana pastoralists from Kenya have been expelled from Kaabong following reports of escalating insecurity in the district.

The pastoralists who migrated from Turkana, Kenya in 2010 due to chronic drought have been camping in Kalapata and Loyoro Sub Counties. The areas lie along the Uganda-Kenya border.

Simon Lolim, the Kaabong Resident District Commissioner confirms the expulsion of the Turkana saying the pastoralists are now a security threat.

He accuses the Turkana of perpetrating killings in Kaabong, a situation which has now gone out of hand.  At least eight people have been reported dead in the recent past in attacks suspected to be launched by the pastoralists. They are also accused raiding over 300 head of cattle.

Lolim says the continued stay in Uganda by the pastoralists is not only illegal but is a threat to the safety of the people of Kaabong.
 
//cue in:  “As per now,
Cue out:  .animals.”//

Samson Lokeris, the area member of parliament for Dodoth constituency says that the pastoralists have to go back to Kenya and return officially with documents related to their search for grass and water in Karamoja.
 
//cue in: “In our,
Cue out: .should be done.”//

Meanwhile, Peter Lokoel, the Deputy Governor Turkana County government tells Uganda Radio Network that Kaabong leaders are unfair to the pastoralists. He adds that 13 of the pastoralists have been murdered in cold blood during the last two months and over 800 of their animals stolen by the Dodoth ethnicity in Kaabong.
 
The Turkana pastoralists have since relocated to Kotido district.
 
 

 

About the author

Olandason Wanyama
Olandason Wanyama is the Karamoja region bureau chief. Amudat, Nakapiripirit, Moroto, Abim, Kotido and Kaabong districts fall under his docket. Wanyama has been a URN staff member since 2012.

The former teacher boasts of 20 years journalism experience. Wanyama started out as a freelance writer for the Daily Monitor newspaper in 1991 in Entebbe. Wanyama also wrote for the army publication Tarehe Sita, the Uganda National Roads Authority (UNRA) magazine and The New Vision. While not on the beat, Wanyama taught child soldiers at Uganda Airforce School-Katabi.

Wanyama is very interested in conflict reporting, climate change, education, health and business reporting. He is also an avid photographic chronicler of vanishing tribal life in the East African region.