Nakapiripirit Districts Bans Movement, Slaughter of Pigs

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In short
African Swine Fever which is characterized by high fever, loss of appetite and bleeding under the skin and internal organs, has no known treatment or vaccine and the best preventive measure. It has claimed hundreds of pigs in Nakapiripirit district forcing authorities to ban the movement and slaughter of pigs in the area.

Nakapiripirit district local government has banned the movement and slaughter of pigs following an outbreak of African swine fever, a highly contagious disease that has killed hundreds of pigs in the district.

The District Veterinary Officer Dr. Dominic Kathia says hundreds of pigs have succumbed to the disease leaving a number of families economically insecure as farmers struggle to contain the outbreak. 

Although the disease poses no danger to human health, it has serious consequences for commercial or smallholder production and potentially crippling socio-economic consequences for farmer livelihoods. It causes high pig mortality of up to 100 percent.

Its transmission is by pigs eating infected pork or pork products, contact with infected pigs or their feces or body fluids or contact with contaminated clothing and foot ware of animal attendants. Its eradication is by destruction of infected animals, and proper disposal of carcasses.

The disease, characterized by high fever, loss of appetite and bleeding under the skin and internal organs, has no known treatment or vaccine and the best preventive measure.

Kathia says that the viral fever wiped out the entire pig population in the town council leaving farmers bare. It also poses a huge food security risk among families who depend on pig rearing as an income generating activity.
 
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Kathia advises farmers to disinfect their stys to avoid contaminating new herds. He also advised farmers to diversify income generating activities.
 
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At least 1.1 million families in Uganda depend on piggery as a backyard activity in smallholder households in Peri-urban and rural areas, according to the International Livestock Research Institute-Nairobi
 

 

About the author

Olandason Wanyama
Olandason Wanyama is the Karamoja region bureau chief. Amudat, Nakapiripirit, Moroto, Abim, Kotido and Kaabong districts fall under his docket. Wanyama has been a URN staff member since 2012.

The former teacher boasts of 20 years journalism experience. Wanyama started out as a freelance writer for the Daily Monitor newspaper in 1991 in Entebbe. Wanyama also wrote for the army publication Tarehe Sita, the Uganda National Roads Authority (UNRA) magazine and The New Vision. While not on the beat, Wanyama taught child soldiers at Uganda Airforce School-Katabi.

Wanyama is very interested in conflict reporting, climate change, education, health and business reporting. He is also an avid photographic chronicler of vanishing tribal life in the East African region.