Rwenzururu King Demands for Mineral Royalties

4240 Views Kasese, Uganda

In short
The Rwenzururu King Charles Wesley Mumbere has asked the government to divert all the royalties that have been going to the central government and Tooro kingdom to his kingdom.

The Rwenzururu King Charles Wesley Mumbere has asked the government to divert all the royalties that have been going to the central government and Tooro kingdom to his kingdom.

In his speech at his 46th coronation anniversary held at Kilembe Golf Club in Kasese Municipality on Friday, Mumbere said that Tooro kingdom still receives royalties from resources in the Rwenzururu kingdom. He said that since Rwenzururu institution has been recognized, all royalties must revert to it.

Some of the resources he mentioned include Katwe salt lake, Kilembe Mines, Hima cement factory and the Queen Elizabeth national park.

He added that these royalties were given to Tooro kingdom by the colonial government because Tooro kingdom administered Kasese by then. Kasese that is now part of Rwenzururu Kingdom was part of Tooro until 1961, when the Bamba and Bakonzo leaders walked out of the Tooro parliament to form Rwenzururu rebellion. They accused Tooro of mistreatment.
In October 1966, the leaders led by Isaya Mukirania, the father of Mumbere, declared Bwamba and Bwera Rwenzururu Kingdom.But the Kingdom was neither recognised by Tooro nor by government until 2009, when President Yoweri Museveni officiated at the installation of Mumbere as Omusinga.

Mumbere also condemned the perpetrators of the July 2012 tribal clashes in both Bundibugyo and Kasese districts saying that their move was uncalled for.
He appealed to the government to bring all the perpetrators to book.

He said that despite some individual problems he still considers Bamba and Basongora to be part of his kingdom.
Recently, the Basongora crowned their own king Ivan Rwigi Rutakirwa Bwebale and denounced all Rwenzururu activities in predominantly Basongora communities. The Bamba are also in the process in installing their own cultural leader, Major Martin Kamya, who is currently a serving army officer.

Vice President Edward Sekandi who presided over the function could not answer any of Mumbere’s pleas but promised to deliver the message to the president.
 
When contacted, Tooro Kingdom spokesperson Arthur Namara down-played Mumbere’s appeals saying the Rwenzururu leader has the right to ask for whatever he wants without involving Tooro. Namara said that as Tooro, they do not recognise Rwenzururu Kingdom, stressing that it never existed and that it is a creation of yesterday by the government.

Article 246 of the Constitution provides for the creation of cultural institutions in any area of Uganda in accordance with the culture, customs and traditions or wishes and aspirations of the people to whom it applies.

Namara also explained that Tooro is not just a recipient of royalties from Kasese, but a shareholder in some of the institutions. He mentioned Hima Cement and Katwe salt lake as some of the institutions where the kingdom had shares until 1967 when all kingdoms were abolished.
 
Namara said that after the kingdoms were restored in 1993, Tooro is yet to push for its shares, but does not give the figures on the actual number of shares and who controlled them when kingdoms were in abeyance.