Uganda's Democratic Path Gradually Becoming Slippery - Report

1882 Views Kampala, Uganda

In short
The finding is carried in the Uganda Self-Assessment draft report, 2016, authored by the National planning Authority NPA as part of the African Peer Review Mechanism APRM, a mutually agreed instrument for self-monitoring adopted by member states of the African Union AU.

Uganda has been put under spotlight for suffocating fundamental freedoms of Ugandans and failing to promote democratic governance.

The finding is carried in the Uganda Self-Assessment draft report, 2016, authored by the National planning Authority (NPA) as part of the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM), a mutually agreed instrument for self-monitoring adopted by member states of the African Union (AU).

This is the second time Uganda is self-assessing itself after the 2008 peer review.

The draft report of the second review points out that space within which political parties exercise their mandate appears to be constricted with a perception that the opposition does not have the freedom to mobilize and organize to participate in political processes.

Political bias within the Uganda Police and other security agencies exhibited in the run up to the 2016 general elections has also been highlighted as an indicator of an unleveled playing field for different political actors in the country.

Drake Rukundo, NPA's Lead Consultant said that such inconsistencies dent Uganda's governance track because citizens are not given an opportunity to participate in crucial decisions impacting their lives. 

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Rukundo worked together with other thematic consultants including Ibrahim Mike Okumu, Hilary Magunda and Geoffrey Bakunda.

The African Peer Review Mechanism-APRM was established in 2003 to foster the adoption of policies, standards, and practices that would lead to political stability, high economic growth, sustainable development and accelerated sub-regional and continental integration through sharing of experiences and reinforcement of successful best practice.

So far, 37 out of 54 African countries have acceded to the African Peer Review Mechanism APRM. 

 

About the author

Olive Nakatudde
Olive Nakatudde is a URN journalist based in Kampala. Nakatudde has been a URN staff member since 2013.

Nakatudde started out in journalism in 2009 with Dembe FM radio in Kampala. In 2012, Nakatudde joined Voice of Africa as a political reporter. She has been a photographer since her journalism school days at Makerere University.

Nakatudde is interested in good governance and public policy, which she reports on intensively from the Uganda Parliament. She is a keen follower of cultural affairs in Buganda Kingdom and covers the kingdom's Lukiiko (parliament). Nakatudde also reports on education and health.