Police Form Donation expected to Boost Access to Justice

1417 Views Gulu, Uganda

In short
The Form is given to victims and survivors of a crime after an assessment by the police officer that there is reasonable basis to believe that an offense has been committed against them. The forms are then used to assist the prosecution of crimes involving sexual violence under the Penal Code Act.

Victims of assault and sexual gender based violence in Gulu district will be relieved of payments to access police forms thanks to an effort by an area Non-Government organization Human Rights Focus-HURIFO.

The organization has donated up to 6000 copies of police forms 3, 3A to stations across the district saving victims payments ranging between Ugx 400 and 20,000.

The Form is given to victims and survivors of a crime after an assessment by the police officer that there is reasonable basis to believe that an offence has been committed against them.  The forms are then used to assist the prosecution of crimes involving sexual violence under the Penal Code Act.

Francis Odongyoo, the Executive Director of HURIFO observes that often victims and their relatives are constrained by the long distances they have to travel to access the form or even get copies out of it. He says the scenario then slows the administration of justice for victims and survivors of gender based violence.

Odongyoo is optimistic that the availability of these forms will now promote access to justice for victims of torture and sexual gender based violence in commemoration of the United Nations international day in support of torture victims.

Cue in: “the police have few………
Cue out:…… process of justice”//

Similarly, Simon Peter Wafana, the Aswa regional police commander says the initial charge attached to the form has quite often stalled administration of justice as some victims fail to effect the payment while sometimes they are inaccessible.

//Cue in: “now these forms……….
Cue out: ……already been having”//

 

 

About the author

Alex Otto
“Journalism that changes lives is my goal,” Alex Otto has said on more than one occasion. That is his career’s guiding principle. Has been since he was a radio journalist in the northern Ugandan town of Gulu in 2009.

Otto passionately believes his journalism should bring to the fore the voices of the voiceless like the shooting victims of Apaa. Otto tries in his journalism to ask tough questions to those in positions of authority.

Based in the Kampala bureau, Otto is especially interested in covering agriculture, politics, education, human rights, crime, environment and business. He has reported intensively on the post-conflict situation in northern Uganda.

A URN staff member since 2014, Otto previously worked with The Observer Newspaper from 2012 to 2013 and later the Institute for War and Peace Reporting IWPR based in Gulu.

He was the URN Gulu bureau chief 2014-2016.