Physical Planning Eludes Emerging Nakaseke Towns

2323 Views Nakaseke, Uganda

In short
Kirangazi town is also growing rapidly because of the thriving charcoal and cattle trade. Kapeeka town board is growing due to the construction of Namukekera Agro based industries that was started by General Salim Saleh to stop rural-urban migration.

Lack of physical planning and poor sanitation are some of the major challenges facing emerging towns in Nakaseke district. The most affected towns include Kakoola Corner Kilak, Kabeebe, Kirangazi and Kapeeka town board among others. Kakoola Corner Kilak growing at a faster pace due its strategic location near Singo Army Training School. Residents here provide services to soldiers varying from soft drinks, food and entertainment among others.
 
Kirangazi town is also growing rapidly because of the thriving charcoal and cattle trade. Kapeeka town board is growing due to the construction of Namukekera Agro based industries that was started by General Salim Saleh to stop rural-urban migration. As a result, several modern structures have cropped upto accommodate the huge influx of people seeking to settle in the area.  There are between 2000 and 5000 people in Kirangazi town board.
 
Local leaders are worried about a possible epidemic outbreak because of the squalid living conditions in the new towns due to lack of physical planning. George Katongole, the LC I chairperson West Zone in Kakoola Corner Kilak says due to lack of physical planning; the houses are congested and lack even access routes. He says most of the houses lack, which forces residents to ease themselves in polythene bags and deposit human waste in the open.
 
A mini survey carried out by URN in the emerging towns showed that 4 out of 10 households lacked toilets. Residents admitted sharing the few available sanitary facilities or defecating in the open. Steven Mukiibi, a resident of Kakoola West Zone says it is unfortunate for the district to solicit taxes from mushrooming towns without paying attention to the unplanned developments.
 
Residents also decried lack of boreholes or clean water sources, which has left them to depend on water from River Mayanja and Wells that they share with animals.

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Moses Ssenfuma, the LC 3 chairperson Kapeeka Sub County says that they recently embarked on developing a master plan for Kapeeka town board that has expanded to two square kilometers but they were asked for 80 million shillings, which they don’t have. Ssenfuuma says they are waiting for the intervention of the district or ministry of Lands, Housing and Urban development. Efforts to get a comment from Nakaseke District Planner Paul Galabuzi and District Health Officer Aidah Nakaye were unfruitful.
 
But Ignatius Koomu, the Nakaseke LC 5 Chairperson says the district is likely to plunge into conflicts in the near future when the start demolishing structures to enforce physical planning guidelines.

He blasts the planning unit for the slow response to streamline the physical planning of the towns despite the overwhelming demand.

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A UN-habitat observatory report, 2007, ranked Uganda among developing countries with fast annual slum growth rate, averaging 5.32%. Records from the Ministry of Land, Housing and Urban development also indicate Uganda has an accumulation of 1.6 million substandard houses that are inappropriate for human life. The National Physical Planning act 2010 is yet to be enforced countrywide.

 

About the author

Brian Luwaga
Since Brian Luwaga joined Uganda Radio Network in 2011, he is still amazed how, "URN is a place that gives journalists a chance to enhance their skills . It gives a journalist an opportunity to adopt and master various aspects of journalism that include radio broadcast, social media, photography and television production."

A practicing journalist since 2009, first with Star FM, Luwaga has always been keen to write about the concerns of the "common person." Based for much of his career in Luweero, Luwaga takes it as a compliment if politicians complain that his reporting is too harsh.

In his journalism, Luwaga likes to merge the past with the present. He believes you cannot understand what is happening now, if you do not have a grounding in the past. Brian Luwaga is the Luweero URN bureau chief. Nakasongola, Nakaseke, Mityana, Mubende and Wakiso districts fall under his docket.

Luwaga is interested in humanitarian work and is a keen Rotarian.