P.7 Leavers Encouraged to Embrace Vocational Training

3030 Views Kampala, Uganda

In short
Courses after P.7 include landscaping, cleaning services, carpentry and joinery, cabinet making, painting and decorating, bricklaying, industrial control, electrical installations, plumbing and heating, amongst others.

The State Minister for Primary Education Rosemary Seninde has encouraged Primary Seven leavers to go for technical training as an alternative route to a better future.

 
Speaking at the ceremony to release the 2018 Primary Leaving Examinations (PLE) results in Kampala, Seninde says while heading to Senior One is in order, heading the other way to technical school is also rewarding.

 
Seninde encourages parents to consider taking their children to take their children to technical schools, stating that they are not for failures as is perceived.

 
//Cue in Mama …
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Although many P.7 leavers join secondary schools, options for vocational education exist under the Universal Post Primary Education Training (UPPET) programme.

 
According to the education ministry, at least 10 percent of P.7 leavers have the option of doing vocational training straight away.

 
Courses after P.7 include landscaping, cleaning services, carpentry and joinery, cabinet making, painting and decorating, bricklaying, industrial control, electrical installations, plumbing and heating, amongst others.

 
According to the Education Policy Data Centre of FHI360, an international non-governmental organization, while the transition rate from primary to secondary is 58 percent, only 34 percent of those who transit complete Senior Four.

 
A study, the 2015-16 Education and Sports Sector Annual Performance Report (ESSAPR), also shows that about 1.2 million students of the 3.6 million pupils who passed Primary Leaving Examination (PLE) between 2002 and 2011 did not complete O-level.

 
The analysis considered UNEB and ESSAPR records of learners who passed PLE between 2002 and 2011 and sat their Uganda Certificate of Education (UCE) examinations between 2006 and 2015.

 
The perception that products of these courses do not succeed in life has been debunked because many are quite successful, compared to those who continued through secondary education.

 

About the author

David Rupiny
In his own words, David Rupiny says, "I am literally a self-trained journalist with over 12 years of experience. Add the formative, student days then I can trace my journalism roots to 1988 when as a fresher in Ordinary Level I used to report for The Giraffe News at St Aloysius College Nyapea in northern Uganda.


In addition to URN for which I have worked for five years now, I have had stints at Radio Paidha, Radio Pacis, Nile FM and KFM. I have also contributed stories for The Crusader, The New Vision and The Monitor. I have also been a contributor for international news organisations like the BBC and Institute for War and Peace Reporting. I am also a local stringer for Radio Netherlands Worldwide.


I am also a media entrepreneur. I founded The West Niler newspaper and now runs Rainbow Media Corporation (Rainbow Radio 88.2 FM in Nebbi). My areas of interest are conflict and peacebuilding, business, climate change, health and children and young people, among others."