Numeracy, Literacy Skills Still Elude Primary Pupils - Report

1417 Views Kampala, Uganda

In short
The appeal is based on the finding that two out of 10 pupils in schools across Uganda cannot do basic primary two class work by the time they reach primary seven. Similarly, only two out of 10 pupils can read and comprehend a primary two English story by the time they complete the primary cycle of education.

Government is urged to prioritize provision of text books as a critical input to help school going children make faster progress in literacy and numeracy.

The appeal is based on the finding that two out of 10 pupils in schools across Uganda cannot do basic primary two class work by the time they reach primary seven. Similarly, only two out of 10 pupils can read and comprehend a primary two English story by the time they complete the primary cycle of education.

These, among other findings, are embedded in the Uganda sixth learning assessment report released by Uwezo, a program of Twaweza east Africa, an initiative that promotes access to information, citizen agency and improved service delivery outcomes across the region.

The principal finding in the report, echoes results from five years ago, to the effect that the current education system does not enable children to acquire foundational skills of literacy and numeracy as outlined in the education curriculum.

The report, which provides the annual monitoring of children's literacy and numeracy competencies in schools, assessed more than 164,000 children aged between 6-16 years in 112 districts. The goal was to answer the  question; Are our children learning?

Twaweza Country Lead and Manager Dr Mary Goretti Nakabugo says that only a few pupils in schools across the country have a text book for their individual use for English, local languages or mathematics.  She adds that the findings are disturbing.
 
//Cue in; we have really…
Cue out……deserves a chance."//

Stark variations were also recorded in learning outcomes across regions, according to the report. It shows that up to 20 bottom districts are in northern and Eastern regions, while the top 20 districts are in western and central regions.

The study established that the regions also lag behind in terms of the provision of teachers and classrooms in government primary schools, according to Dr Dr Nakabugo.

//Cue in; consistently children…
Cue out…. the entire nation."//

She adds that adequate provision of school resources including classrooms and other incentives could encourage teachers to accept appointments in hard to reach and disadvantaged areas and reduce regional inequalities in the long run.