NEMA Drafts Policy to Regulate E-Waste Disposal

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In short
Namara explains that such metals could build up in fatty tissues and reach toxic levels over time. She warns that if such metals are allowed to leak into the environment, they may contaminate water sources and soil.

The National Environment Management Authority- NEMA is drafting a policy to regulate the disposal of Electronic waste in the country. Currently, most of the waste including E-waste isdisposed off at Kitezi landfill. Naomi Namara, the Head of Public Relations NEMA explains that electronics have components that require specialist treatment to minimize their impact on the environment. Some contain concentrations of toxic heavy metals, cadmium, lead, nickel, mercury, manganese, lithium, zinc, arsenic, antimony, beryllium, and copper.
 
Namara explains that such metals could build up in fatty tissues and reach toxic levels over time.  She warns that if such metals are allowed to leak into the environment, they may contaminate water sources and soil. Once metals build up in the soil, or accumulate in the food, they become a health risk.

//Cue in: there are several…’’
Cue Out:…best practice’’.//

A walk through down town Kampala reveals a string of shops dealing used electronics such as computer, mobile phones, fridges and televisions Umar Khauka a dealer in computer parts says most of the electronic waste is generated from outdated or second hand equipments that are remodeled and re-used.

//Cue in:  Iam into…’’
Cue Out:…those chips’’.//

Kiseka Hussein, another electronic dealer says he is aware that at a point he needs to dispose  the waste generated, but normally sells cheaply to informal scrap dealers and do not know where the waste ends up.

//Cue in: Since we…’’
Cue Out:..them cheaply’’.//

Although there is no clear disposal mechanism of all electronic waste or e-waste, in 2010 theGovernment implemented a complete ban on the importation of second hand electronics.
 
Soon after, importers of second hand appliances cried foul for incurred losses. In the same year, NEMA promised to construct an electronic waste management facility but this has not been done, even as new and second-hand electronic equipment in the country, slowly build up the volume of e-waste.