Muslim Leaders Call For Action On Global Warming Top story

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Islamic leaders have called on the worlds 1.6 billion Muslims to play an active role in combating climate change and have urged governments to conclude an effective universal climate change agreement in Paris at the end of the year.

Islamic leaders have called on the world's 1.6 billion Muslims to play an active role in combating climate change and have urged governments to conclude an effective universal climate change agreement in Paris at the end of the year.

Faith leaders, senior international development policy makers, academics and other experts made the call in an Islamic Declaration on Climate adopted at an International Islamic Climate Change Symposium in Istanbul on Tuesday.

The leaders called on governments meeting in Paris to "bring their discussions to an equitable and binding conclusion" .

The symposium attended by the Mufti of Uganda, Sheikh Shaban Ramadhan Mubajje urged the governments meeting at UN Climate Change conference in Paris this December, to set clear targets and monitoring systems to stop global warming.

The Muslim leaders also called on world population and their leaders to phase out greenhouse gas emissions and to commit themselves to 100 % renewable energy and a zero emissions strategy.

They specifically called on richer nations and oil-producing states to lead the way in phasing out their greenhouse gas emissions no later than the middle of the century.

Speaking on the first day of the International Islamic Climate Change Symposium on Monday, the UNFCCC's Director for Strategy Halldór Thorgeirsson set out the UN's key expectations for the universal climate change agreement in December.

He said: "Due to the fact that warming from carbon dioxide persists for many centuries, any upper limit on warming requires net carbon dioxide emissions to eventually fall to zero" 

Thorgeirsson said avoiding dangerous climate change therefore requires fundamental economic transformation, not fine tuning of existing systems, leading to deep, and later full, decarbonisation of energy supply.

Several faiths and denominations have this year called on governments to take action at the Paris climate meeting, along with pledging climate action themselves.

In June, Pope Francis released a papal encyclical letter, in which, he called on the world's 1.2 billion Catholics to join the fight against climate change.

The Church of England's General Synod recently urged world leaders to agree long term pathways to a low carbon future, and promised to redirect their resources into promoting the use of clean energy.