Museveni Intervenes In Masaka School, Agha Khan Land Wrangles

5916 Views Masaka, Uganda

In short
President Yoweri Museveni has intervened in the Masaka secondary school and the Agha Khan Foundation rent wrangles, directing the school to stop paying annual rent.

President Yoweri Museveni has intervened in the Masaka secondary school and the Agha Khan Foundation rent wrangles, directing the school to stop paying annual rent.

Over the years, Masaka Secondary school has been paying over 300 million shillings to Agha Khan Foundation as rental fees for using its facilities. The foundation owns the land and the buildings that house Masaka secondary school.

Last year, the school wrote to President Museveni asking for his intervention to stop Agha Khan from collecting the 300 million shilling rent.  The school directors argued that since it is in the process of acquiring a land title for the school premises from Agha Khan Foundation whose lease expired, it was no longer necessary to pay the money.

Musa Mpungu, the Masaka Secondary school headmaster now says the president has written back giving the school a green light to stop any further payments of rent to Agha Khan Foundation. The headmaster, however, declined to divulge further details of the letter.

But Tamale Mirundi, the presidential press secretary says he is not aware of the said directive but promised to crosscheck further.
 
Mpungu says the money will now be diverted to construct five more classroom blocks at the school to address the problem of congestion. He argues that with a student population of over 4500, the school is facing an acute class room crisis.

Mpungu claims that over 800 senior one students and 400 senior five students of the school are sharing crowded classrooms due to lack of space, which affects students’ concentration. Mpungu says although the students pay fees, the school meets almost 60% of the teachers’ salaries as all the money goes to pay rent.

David Kayanja, a senior five student at the school says lack of enough space is forcing some of them to miss lessons. Kayanja explains that they are required to rush to class very early, otherwise they miss out on lessons due to lack of space.

Kayanja argues that due to congestion, they are not always attentive in class because some students keep making noise in class because the teachers can’t monitor the back benchers.

Agha Khan Foundation has no yet commented on the president’s directive.

Recently, Government announced plans to renovate classroom blocks at Masaka secondary school which will involve replacing the rusty asbestos roof.

Government has also started constructing a six-storied classroom block at the school with funding from African Development Bank. If completed, it will go a long way in addressing the classroom crisis.
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