Karamoja Cluster: Leaders Root For Disarmament

2922 Views Kataboi, Kenya

In short
The area straddles the Nyangatom from Ethiopia, Toposa in South Sudan, the Turkana living in North Western Kenya and the Karimojong among others. The area is populated by 14 pastoralist tribes who share a common language, culture and way of life.

Leaders operating under the Karamoja cluster in Eastern Africa have resolved to disarm pastoralists within their jurisdiction saying communities are now appalled by the burden of insecurity.

The area straddles the Nyangatom from Ethiopia, Toposa in South Sudan, the Turkana living in North Western Kenya and the Karimojong among others. The area is populated by 14 pastoralist tribes who share a common language, culture and way of life.

Josephat Nanok, the Governor Turkana County observes that leaders in the affected pastoral communities need to come together and devise an everlasting solution to protect the lives of the people and their property. He mentions that persistent attacks have impacted on the development of pastoralism as a livelihood.
 
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Fr. Simon Lokodo, the State Minister for Ethics and Integrity urges the leaders to borrow a leaf from Uganda. He explains that before the disarmament in Karamoja, the country suffered a setback with several military coups since 1962. He therefore, says government in Sudan, Kenya and Ethiopia should unite to ensure that pastoralists voluntarily or forcefully return arms to security agencies.
 

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Soya Kurupa Lasbuk, a Nyangatom leader tasks governments that cover Karamoja cluster to find peaceful ways of ending the recurrent conflict. He adds that area needs to be transformed to a nonviolent and wealthy region after decades of mistrust among the communities.

He urges pastoralists to work with security agencies so as to avoid direct confrontation the major cause of conflict.
 

 

About the author

Olandason Wanyama
Olandason Wanyama is the Karamoja region bureau chief. Amudat, Nakapiripirit, Moroto, Abim, Kotido and Kaabong districts fall under his docket. Wanyama has been a URN staff member since 2012.

The former teacher boasts of 20 years journalism experience. Wanyama started out as a freelance writer for the Daily Monitor newspaper in 1991 in Entebbe. Wanyama also wrote for the army publication Tarehe Sita, the Uganda National Roads Authority (UNRA) magazine and The New Vision. While not on the beat, Wanyama taught child soldiers at Uganda Airforce School-Katabi.

Wanyama is very interested in conflict reporting, climate change, education, health and business reporting. He is also an avid photographic chronicler of vanishing tribal life in the East African region.