Former Amin Air Force Commander Buried Without Military Honours Top story

2963 Views Arua, Uganda

In short
Major John Nyanzi, the 409 acting Brigade commander concurs with the former soldiers that the army should have honored Lt. Col Orombi but blames it on the lack of enough officers at his rank in the region.

Hundreds of former soldiers in Arua have protested the failure by the army to honor the late Lt. Colonel Cirlo Orombi, the former Air Force commander in the Iddi Amin and Apollo Milton Obote regimes. Lt Col. Orombi died on Sunday last week and was laid to rest on Wednesday at his ancestral home in Abira Village in Oluko Sub County in Arua district.

Because of his rank, hundreds of former soldiers who turned up for the burial of Lt Colonel Orombi, expected the army to bid him farewell with a gun salute. But this didn’t happen. Abudalatif Tiyoa, the chairperson West Nile ex-combatants wonders why Orombi was not honored with a gun salute, which is a standard practice world over.

He wonders why Orombi was treated differently despite the fact that he also served under the current regime. Valentino Owiny, another former soldier, who was also a friend to the deceased accuses the army of becoming selective.

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Major John Nyanzi, the 409 acting Brigade commander concurs with the former soldiers that the army should have honored Lt. Col Orombi but blames it on the lack of enough officers at his rank in the region.
 
He says they tried to get some officers from the 4 division head quarters in Gulu but it was late. Major John Nyanzi however, says that the army contributed 1 million shillings towards the burial arrangements to the family of the deceased

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Former soldiers who worked with the late Lt Col. Orombi described him as a kind man. Saban Matata says he knew Lt. Col. Orombi as a God fearing and development oriented person. He explains that Orombi offered his private to government for the establishment of a barracks.

Born on October 12, 1937, Orombi joined the then Uganda Army on September 11, 1968 under No. U0/0496. He fled into exile to Sudan in 1985 after the fall of the Obote 11 regime. He returned to Uganda in 1991 and was re-instated in the National Resistance Army (NRA). He is survived by 11 children and a widow.