5 Land Dispute Hotspots In Lamwo

2338 Views Kitgum, Uganda

In short
John Komakech Ogwok, Lamwo district chairperson says their findings indicate that the sub counties of Palabek Gem, Palabek Ogili, Padibe East, Paluga and Agoro are worst hit. The leaders say disputes in these hot spots easily degenerate into loss of lives and destruction of property.

Lamwo district security committee has classified five sub counties in the district as hotspots for violent land wrangles. It says the remaining six are relatively peaceful.
  
The committee leaders say disputes in the hotspots easily degenerate into loss of lives and destruction of property. To gain better insights into the disputes and find lasting solutions, the committee has just completed a mapping exercise of the affected areas.
 
The committee brings together the district local council executive, the district internal security officer, the resident district commissioner and the police commander.
  
John Komakech Ogwok, Lamwo district chairperson says their findings indicate that the sub counties of Palabek Gem, Palabek Ogili, Padibe East, Paluga and Agoro are worst hit.
  
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Komakech says the violence has three major triggers including population pressure, economic value attached to land in post conflict situation, and incitement and land grabbing. 
  
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In Palabek Gem, a family is embroiled in a bloody land wrangle with their nephews. The dispute has left three people dead, 13 huts burnt down and several crop fields destroyed as sides in the conflict defend their claims.
  
Robinson Wontwero, a resident of Burnyang village in Palabek Gem Sub County says they have been forced to arm themselves with bows and arrows after several attacks.
  
Jonathan Rutabingwa, the chairperson of Lamwo district security committee says some of the disputes involve entire an chiefdom. He cites a case in which three clans in Madi Opei sub county resisted construction of Gulu - Acholibur - Musingo trade route.  
  
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To Rutabingwa, the formal justice system is encouraging alternative dispute resolution to restore peace among conflicting parties after realising several of its rulings had been violated.
  
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Most of the land under disputes is former hunting grounds and grazing grounds required for sale or establishment of plantations.
 
 

 

About the author

Peter Labeja
Peter Labeja has been a practicing journalist for the last 13 years during which he has covered part of the brutal conflict which bedeviled Northern Uganda as well as the painful transition to Peace thereafter. Emerging post conflict issues such as land rights of under privileged widows and orphans, challenges of access to social services in the immediate aftermath of Lord’s Resistance Army conflict in Northern Uganda.

Labeja is now the Northern Uganda Bureau chief in Acholi Sub Region since 2014 - Gulu, Amuru, Nwoya and Omoro districts as well as South Sudan falls within his areas of jurisdiction. He previously worked with The Vision Group for four years.

Labeja’s major career interests are in Climate Change; Agriculture and Environment - natural resources such as Water, Oil and Gas; Transitional Justice; Human Rights, Democracy and Governance as well as South Sudan’s humanitarian crisis. In 2013, Labeja was awarded a prestigious Pan African Journalism Award for excellence in journalism at United Nation’s UNEP headquarters in Nairobi, Kenya for Climate Change and Health Reporting.