Experts Demand Economic Perspective To River Nile Water Management

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In short
Economists from the Nile Basin countries say there is a compelling case as to why the member states under the Nile Basin Initiative should apply economics principles when sharing river Nile and it resources.

River Nile is a key source of water and electricity  to Uganda and nine countries but sharing this resource remains politically tricky. Experts meeting in Entebbe are calling for an economic perspective in the management and utilisation of  the Nile waters.

Economists from the Nile Basin countries say there is a compelling case as to why the member states under the Nile Basin Initiative should apply economics principles when sharing river Nile and it resources.
 
The application of economics principles partly relates to "treating water as an economic good"  It   relates to making the right choices about optimal use and optimal allocation of water among users on the basis of socio-economic trade-off analysis.
 
Jackson Twinomujuni, Commissioner for International and Transboundary Water Affairs at the Ministry of Water and Environment while opening the meeting said the integration of economics principles in the shared water body will ensure that it utilized for the benefit of the present population and the generations to come.
 
The increasing scarcity of water resources in terms of quantity and quality is one of the most pervasive natural resource allocation issues facing development planners throughout the world.
 
 
Within the Nile Basin region, the quality the water is becoming a big issue. Economists want government to consider the economic value of ensuring that the water remains clean so that people who use it don't fall sick.
 
Jackson Twinomujuni in an interview said managing water is highly capital-intensive and yet capital is scarce.
Twinomujuni says with economics principles; any intervention on the river would require economists to analyze impacts of the proposed scheme upon the catchment as a whole.
The Nile Basin Initiative Secretariat Executive Director, Eng. Innocent Ntabana, said economic considerations play a vital role in water resources management. 
 
He noted that incorporating the economic key dimensions is essential for optimising water uses, making better use of the available water and the related resources.
 
Experts speaking at the forum highlighted the importance of  strengthen on-going developments in the water sector with plans concerning the energy and agricultural sectors, as both rely, to a large extent, on the use of water.
 
The Nile Basin Initiative is a regional inter-governmental partnership launched by the Nile Basin countries on February 22, 1999, to manage and develop the shared Nile Basin water and related resources in a cooperative manner, share substantial socio-economic benefits, and promote regional peace and security.
 
There are 10 Nile Basin Initiative Member States: Burundi, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Egypt, Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, South Sudan, Sudan, Tanzania and Uganda. Eritrea participates as an observer.