DPP Withdraws Whistle Blower Charges Against UDB's Ojangole Top story

1641 Views Kampala, Uganda

In short
The Anti-Corruption Court has discontinued the whistle blower charges against the Chief Executive Officer of the Uganda Development Bank Patricia Ojangole, bringing the over one year legal battle to an end.

The Anti-Corruption Court has discontinued the whistle blower charges against the Chief Executive Officer of the Uganda Development Bank Patricia Ojangole, bringing the over one year legal battle to an end. 

This follows the decision by the Directorof Public Prosecutions Mike Chibita asking court to have the charges dropped. 

Rogers Kinobe, a Public Prosecutor on behalf of the DPP, tendered in court a legal document called ‘Nolle Prosequi', requesting that the proceedings against Ojangole be discontinue. This was after The case had come up for its maiden hearing when this new unfolding happened. 

Ojangole had been accused of victimizing a whistle blower Charlotte Mucunguzi, a then bank employee for having made a disclosure to the Inspectorate of Government about the improper manner in which the UDB board Dr Samuel Ssejjaka and management of UDB was handling a $11.5million (about Shs30b) loan application by Savannah Commodities Limited. 

On receiving the request, presiding Judge Paul Mugamba discontinued the charges against Ojangole before discharging her. 

Her woes begun arose last year on July 29when Ojangole was arrested at the bank premises in Kampala and arraigned before Buganda Road Court. She was jointly charged along with two other bank officials though along the way, they were later acquitted. 

It was alleged that Ojangole dismissed Mucunguzi following her whistle blowing to the IGG. The dismissal of the case comes barely three months after the very court acquitted Ojangole of charges of conflict of interest for lack of evidence. 

The ombudsman had accused her of having participated in various processes and proceedings that culminated in her appointment to the position of CEO of the bank on November, 30, 2012, when she signed the employment contract but knowingly failed to disclose the nature of this interest to the board.