Deputy Speaker Oulanya Advises On Reading Culture

1931 Views Kampala, Uganda

In short
Oulanya said that the young people should take advantage of the abundance of the reading materials to read if they are to be informed and participate in national development.

The Deputy Speaker of the Parliament of Uganda, Rt. Hon. Jacob L'Okori Oulanyah has urged youth to read books especially by Ugandan authors.
 
Oulanya was officiating at book signing event of Dr. Opio Oloya's Black Hawks Rising: The Story of AMISOM's Successful War against Somali Insurgents, 2007-2014 that took place at Aristoc Bookstore at Garden City in Kampala on Saturday. The book costs Shs.159,000 at Aristoc.

Oulanya said that the young people should take advantage of the abundance of reading materials to read if they are to be informed and participate in national development.
 
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This book was launched by President Yoweri Museveni on June 9th 2016 after which he directed that copies be provided to all schools for children to read. Oulanya has committed to make it his responsibility to find how far the responsible ministries have gone towards implementing this directive.

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Brig. Richard Karemire, the Uganda People's Defense Forces - UPDF spokesperson said that the story portrayed in the Black Hawks Rising is a story of hope that every Ugandan should be proud of. He notes that they have already provided copies to students in all Military training schools.
 
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Dr. Oloya is a Ugandan-Canadian based Author born in Pamin-Yai Village, Amuru District, Northern Uganda whose book "Black Hawks Rising" tells the story of the formation and deployment of the African Union Mission to Somalia (AMISOM) in March 2007.
 
Dr. Oloya says that he had no intention of writing this book when he first went to Somalia. He says he was inspired at what Ugandan soldiers were doing and feared that the story of Ugandan soldiers would be distorted once not written.
 
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Sarah Kagingo, the Secretary to the Board of Uganda Reading, a movement aimed at building a strong reading culture in the country said that with the advent of social media today, young people have abandoned reading.
 
She notes that they organized this event to further create awareness on the Uganda authors and available texts as well as inspiring young people to read and write books by emulating this success story of UPDF in Somalia by Dr. Oloya.
 
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Uganda was the first African Country to send its soldiers to Somalia. The first mission troop, Battle Group One (UGABAG1), landed under a hail of fire in Mogadishu on March 6, 2007 under Maj. Gen. Peter Elwelu.
 
Initially confined to peacekeeping within the Mogadishu enclave, it transformed into a peace-making mission.
 
The book in the opening chapters takes the reader behind the scenes to highlight the inconsistent - and sometimes disastrous - US policy in the Horn of Africa generally, and in Somalia (specifically dating back to the Kennedy administration in the early 1960s).

 

 

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About the author

Davidson Ndyabahika
Davidson Ndyabahika is a Journalism major from Makerere University and is passionate about investigative and data journalism with special interest in feature story telling.

He has gone through digital and multi-media training both at Ultimate Multimedia Consult, and has attended Data Journalism Sessions at ACME to enrich his capacity in data journalism.

Davidson has previously freelanced with The Campus Times, The Observer, Chimp reports and URN. He is currently reporting under Education. He is also passionate about reporting on environment, health, crime and political satire writing.

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