Bridge Academies Petition Court Over Closure

1391 Views Kampala, Uganda

In short
Bridge International Academies BIA has petitioned High Court challenging the directive by the Ministry of Education to close all its campuses across the country.

Bridge International Academies (BIA) has petitioned High Court challenging the directive by the Ministry of Education to close all its campuses across the country.

In April this year Dr. Rose Nassali Lukwago, the Permanent Secretary Ministry of Education directed BIA to close all its campuses citing poor hygiene, flouted curricula, employing unqualified teachers and operating without a license.
 
But BIA through its lawyer Isaac Walukaga argues in the application for judicial review that the Ministry made a hurried desk decision without wide consultations.
  
Walukaga told URN that natural justice was not administered and court needs to intervene because the Ministry did not as well offer an alternative plan for relocating over 1,200 pupils enrolled in BIA academies.
  
Walukaga further pointed out that BIA is already complying with the Ministry's laid down guidelines and closing it down would risk the jobs of over 800 teachers who are employed by the entity.
  
On Tuesday August 9th, Janet Museveni the Minister of Education, Science Technology and Sports, informed Parliament that BIA flouted on the curricula and hygiene standards. She explained that she based her decision on the findings of investigations by Uganda National Curriculum Development Centre and Education Standards Unit.
  
Patrick Muinda, the Ministry of Education Publicist said that BIA has been given till end of second term and will not be allowed to operate unless they comply with preconditions set by the Ministry. He added that the pupils enrolled in BIA schools will be relocated to government aided schools.
  
Court is expected to hear the petition on Friday.
  
BIA is a low-cost 'low-fee' multinational chain of profit-making private schools and operates 63 makeshift nursery and primary schools across Uganda and more than 350 others in Kenya, Liberia, Nigeria and Asian countries.