Agencies Need UGX 80 Trillion to Meet Humanitarian Needs in 2017

1513 Views

In short
The humanitarian appeal is the culmination of a global effort to assess needs and decide collective response strategies by hundreds of organizations delivering food, shelter, health care, protection, emergency education and other basic assistance to people in conflict- and disaster-affected regions.

Humanitarian agencies will require USD 22.2 billion (80 trillion Shillings) to meet the needs of people affected by conflict, displacement and natural disasters over the next one year.

This is the highest consolidated humanitarian appeal ever launched. The initial appeal for 2016 stood at USD 20.1 billion (72 trillion Shillings) a glaring contrast to the USD 2.7 billion (9 trillion Shillings) called for in the first six inter-agency humanitarian appeals launched in 1992.

The 2017 humanitarian appeal launched this morning indicates that the last quarter century has seen an overwhelming shift in frequency, scale and magnitude of humanitarian emergencies pushing more vulnerable communities to the brink of survival. They need urgent help to overcome food insecurity, acute malnutrition, disease and other calamities.

Conflicts in South Sudan, Somalia, Central African Republic, Sudan, Burundi and the Democratic Republic of Congo are among the greatest drivers of humanitarian needs, fueling new displacement within countries and across borders.

In Burundi, the political crisis continues to deepen and the number of people in need of urgent support has tripled to 3 million. At least USD 73.7 million (263 billion Shillings) is needed to save them.

Another 6.1 million people, 80 per cent of them women and children, are in need of aid in South Sudan, a conflict which has produced the largest refugee movement in Africa. At least USD 1.3 billion (4.6 trillion Shillings) is needed to support persons displaced by the South Sudan Conflict.

If sufficient funds are not secured for DRC, 4.3 million people will face heightened risk of morbidity or death due to malnutrition, food shortage and epidemics. USD 748 million (2.6 trillion Shillings) is needed to support their humanitarian needs.

"The scale of humanitarian crises today is greater than at any time since the United Nations was founded. Not in living memory have so many people needed our support and solidarity to survive and live in safety and dignity," Stephen O'Brien, the undersecretary general for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief said at the launch of the Global Humanitarian Overview 2017 today.

The humanitarian appeal is the culmination of a global effort to assess needs and decide collective response strategies by hundreds of organizations delivering food, shelter, health care, protection, emergency education and other basic assistance to people in conflict- and disaster-affected regions.

The funding, if secured, will support vital humanitarian operations to deliver urgent relief, protection and support to nearly 93 million of the most vulnerable and marginalized people in 33 countries.

So far in 2016, international donors have provided USD 11.4 billion (40 trillion Shillings) to the current global appeal. However, this represents only 52 percent of the requirements and humanitarian organizations approach the end of this year with a funding gap of a record $10.7 billion (38 trillion Shillings), the largest gap ever.

"The lives of millions of women, girls, boys and men are in our hands," O'Brien said. "By responding generously and delivering fully on this appeal we will prove to them that we will not let them down," he adds.

The appeal also covers countries neighboring South Sudan which are hosting significant numbers of refugees fleeing the conflicts.          

 

About the author

Sylvia Nankya
Sylvia is an Editor and Media Trainer with Uganda Radio Network. She has been a URN staff member since 2013. Sylvia has previously worked as a reporter and news anchor with Radio One (2001-2009) and with Vision Group (2009-2011). Six of her active years in Journalism were spent covering the Parliament of Uganda.

Over the past few years, Sylvia has worked to promote the positive development of societies recovering from conflict through training journalists on choices of stories, how they report issues and use of appropriate language in covering conflict and post-conflict situations.

She is an Alumni of RNTC- Holland, Les Aspin Centre for Government at Marquette University-WI, USA and a Community Solutions Fellow.