International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda Boasts of Rich Legacy

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In short
To date, all but 9 of the 93 individuals who were indicted are now accounted for; The ICTR has made 55 first instance judgments involving 75 people accused of perpetrating genocide in Rwanda. The tribunal has also made 10 referrals to the Rwandan national courts and transferred files of top three fugitives for trial by the newly setup Mechanism for International Criminal Tribunals.

The International Criminal tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) boasts of a rich legacy that has enriched the evolution of international criminal law and put an end to impunity in its 20 years of existence.  

The tribunal was established by the United Nations Security Council and mandated with the formidable task of contributing to reconciliation by bringing to account those most responsible for the planning and execution of the atrocities that occurred in Rwanda in 1994.

At the time, the country witnessed tremendous systematic and widespread mass killings of more than 800,000 people who were killed on account of their blood, birth and political affiliations during the fateful 100 days.

To date, all but 9 of the 93 individuals who were indicted are now accounted for; The ICTR has made 55 first instance judgments involving 75 people accused of perpetrating genocide in Rwanda. The tribunal has also made 10 referrals to the Rwandan national courts and transferred files of top three fugitives for trial by the newly setup Mechanism for International Criminal Tribunals.

ICTR information officer Danford Mpumilwa says the record of prosecution makes them proud as a court. He explains says the court has achieved its mandate of prosecuting the people who played a leading role in orchestrating the genocide. His comments come as the curtains dawn on the tribunal this November as their mandate guaranteed by the Security Council runs out.

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Now Mpumilwa says the tribunal sent out a strong message to the Rwandan people that nobody is above the law by arresting and prosecuting high profile people like the former Prime Minister Jean Kambanda. He says the tribunal in its 20 years of existence has helped stabilize the Rwandan population.
 
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Unfinished work is however evident with nine fugitives still at large including Felicien Kabuga who is among the most wanted men in the world over his role in the Rwanda genocide.

The tribunal has also failed to find state parties to help relocate persons who have been acquitted of charges. A total of ten people are still living in safe houses awaiting a state to take them on and relocate them.

 

Mentioned: ictr

About the author

Raymond Mujuni
Raymond Mujuni is a URN journalist based in Kampala. Mujuni has been a URN staff member since 2013.

Presently a Law student at Makerere University, Kampala, Mujuni started out as a freelancer for URN in 2012.

Mujuni is an investigative journalist, especially interested in Security, Science and Technology. An avid sports fan, Mujuni volunteers with the charity organisation 40 Days/40 Smiles.